Garden House Inn, Durham

If you would like to sponser us please contact us
Garden House Inn, Durham

Garden House Inn, Durham

Posted: 19 Jul 2014

It’s three years since Adrian Grieves launched a new career running a pub at the Garden House Inn in Durham – and he’s clearly loving every minute.

 

The engineering boss’s attention to detail has been applied with steely precision to his new venture.

 

He and son Nick, who runs the kitchen with a team of passionate young chefs, serve up fine British pub grub, local and guest hand-pulled ales – including beers such as Black Sheep and Timothy Taylor. There’s also a nice selection of carefully-chosen wines including sensibly-priced Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot and Malbec.

 

Adrian loves his music and the tunes playing on the pub’s sound system – what would be described in the States as AOR or adult- oriented rock – are as tasteful as the ambience of the pub. In fact they help define its mood – rustic, down-to-earth and relaxed.

 

The bar has a wooden-beamed ceiling and old wooden floors, candlelit tables, and – in a raised area in the corner – cosy armchairs and sofas hug a roaring real fire in the winter.

 

The bar menu is simple and unfussy with tasty main dishes such as minute sirloin steak with tarragon emulsion, watercress and chips at £9, a melt-in-your-mouth beef and ale pie with chive mash and savoy cabbage at £11, or a wonderfully tender 7-hour lamb shank, heritage carrots and celeriac mash, port at £12.

 

Several dining partners swear by the haddock and chips with crushed garden peas and tartare sauce, and the scampi and chips also go down a treat.

 

Even Adrian’s pricing is precise – there’s no £8.95s or £11.95s here to trick you into thinking you’re getting a non-existent bargain like other rivals. Lunch is served 12-2.30pm during the week and 12-5.30pm on Sundays, and dinner is 5.30-9.30pm.

 

In a town-and-gown city, academics and locals frequent the bar, as you would expect. CAMRA enthusiasts can sample up to six hand-pulls and continental lagers. The beer is well-kept and the fonts are sparkling clean.

 

But the inn also caters for visitors with six guest rooms – doubles are priced at £85 per night and family rooms for three people are £95. And just 10 minutes from Durham train station and less than a mile from the city centre and tourist attractions like the Cathedral, the place is proving popular with out-of-town-and gowners too.

 

More ambitious tasting menus and an a la carte offering are also to be had in a large conservatory dining area at the back of the inn. The specials changes on a daily basis according to what is in season. I’ll certainly be back in due course to give those a try.

Michael Hamilton

The Garden House Inn

Framwellgate Peth

Durham

DH1 4NQ

0191 386 3395

www.gardenhouseinn.com 


You May Also Be Interested

Linked Articles:

You May Also Be Interested

Battlesteads, Wark

Battlesteads, Wark

If provenance is the buzzword of the foodie world these days, then the buzz at Battlesteads in Wark must be deafening. For the restaurant sources its herbs, salads and most of its vegetables literally from its own backyard where over an acre of the garden has been turned over to the cultivation of fruit and veg. Food miles – zero. Meat, fish and other foodstuffs also come from as nearby as possible. This insistence on local sourcing along with a range of other envir...

Read More

The Grand Hotel, Tynemouth

The Grand Hotel, Tynemouth

Tynemouth on a warm summer’s evening takes a lot of beating – and a prime position by the window of the Grand Hotel’s Victoria restaurant is an ideal spot from which to watch the waves and the world go by. Combine the sunshine, opulent surroundings and the view with a cracking meal, good service and value for money and you really are onto a winner. Life should always be like this. Sadly, it’s not. Although standards and choice for eating out in the North East have im...

Read More

The Broad Chare, Newcastle

The Broad Chare, Newcastle

Terry Laybourne does it again. It seems that every time the region’s leading restaurateur turns his hand to something new - from high-end fine dining to pop-up tapas bars - he has yet another success to celebrate. This time it’s a pub - but not just any pub. The Broad Chare on Newcastle’s Quayside, fashioned out of an old building and given a new lease of life, is the first in the city to make the prestigious Michelin Good Pub Guide. It is proving as popular for its beer and bar ...

Read More

view

Audio Interviews

Reviews

Thea Gilmore

Thea Gilmore...

Image by Idil Sukan 30 May Thea Gilmore opened a short tour at Sage Gateshead three days before the launch of her fourteenth studi...

Whats on

Open Mic back in Newcastle

Open Mic back in Newcastle...

The North East again plays host to Open Mic UK, the national music competition seeking the country’s best singers, singer-songwriters, rappe...